North Korea Launches Rocket ???

three-stage Unha-3

three-stage Unha-3


I have know idea either way. If they did, they sure got it put back together rather quickly and on the pad. Maybe they scrapped the first rocket and used another ? If so, I would think It would take longer to prep it as the original took 2 to 3 days.

They say the rocket was launched Wednesday December 12 2012 Korea time. [at this posting it’s still Dec. 11th at my location in the US] Who knows what the truth is … so many reporters which 3 corporations control. On with the show …

N. Korea removes rocket from launch pad: report
by Staff Writers
Seoul (AFP) Dec 11, 2012
http://www.spacewar.com/reports/N_Korea_removes_rocket_from_launch_pad_report_999.html

North Korea’s heavily-criticised long range rocket launch looked set for a lengthy delay Tuesday, with reports that the entire rocket had been removed from the launch pad for repair.

According to analysis of the latest satellite imagery, the entire three-stage Unha-3 carrier has been taken down and moved to a nearby assembly facility, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency quoted a military source as saying.

“It seems that North Korea has pulled down the rocket from the launch pad to fix technical problems,” the source said. Local radio and TV stations carried similar reports.

The South Korean Defence Ministry refused to confirm the reports which, if true, would signal a considerable delay in the launch schedule.

N. Korea Reportedly Removes Rocket From Launch Pad
http://www.voanews.com/content/north-korea-said-taking-apart-rocket-for-repairs/1562483.html

VOA News

December 11, 2012
North Korea appears to have taken apart and moved its long-range rocket, a day after announcing that technical difficulties had caused a one-week delay of its launch.

South Korea’s Yonhap news agency quoted a military source as saying satellite photos suggest technicians have disassembled the three-stage rocket and moved it to a nearby assembly facility.

The unidentified source said North Korea pulled the rocket from the launch pad to fix technical problems.

===========================

South Korea says North Korea has fired a long-range rocket in a defiant move

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/south-korea-says-north-korea-has-fired-a-long-range-rocket-in-a-defiant-move/2012/12/11/66aa6d06-43f9-11e2-8c8f-fbebf7ccab4e_story.html

By Associated Press,

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea fired a long-range rocket Wednesday in its second launch under its new leader, South Korean officials said, defying warnings from the U.N. and Washington only days before South Korean presidential elections.

South Korean defense officials said the rocket was fired from a west coast launch pad but there was no immediate word if the rocket was successful. North Korea had indicated technical problems with the rocket and extended its launch window. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity, citing office rules.

North Korea Launches Rocket

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324024004578174000078592218.html

SEOUL—North Korea launched a multistage rocket Wednesday morning, its second this year and fifth ever, in an apparent acceleration of a years-long effort to develop long-range missile capability.

It flew farther than a North Korean rocket that failed 80 seconds after takeoff in April, according to officials monitoring the launch in other countries.

Advertisements

Site 911 : Mysterious project in #Israel

Via: Washington Post:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to supervise construction of a five-story underground facility for an Israel Defense Forces complex, oddly named “Site 911,” at an Israeli Air Force base near Tel Aviv.

Expected to take more than two years to build, at a cost of up to $100 million, the facility is to have classrooms on Level 1, an auditorium on Level 3, a laboratory, shock-resistant doors, protection from nonionizing radiation and very tight security. Clearances will be required for all construction workers, guards will be at the fence and barriers will separate it from the rest of the base.

Over the years, the Corps has built underground hangers for Israeli fighter-bombers, facilities for handling nuclear weapons (though Israel does not admit having such weapons), command centers, training bases, intelligence facilities and simulators, according to Corps publications.

#WAR – Something Happening Here ..

.. What it is ain’t exactly clear.

I don’t know what’s up but I can tell you this, it’ll likely lead to more war.

What I’m speaking about is unusual fire training on Base [Military Base]. Normally the only thing you hear are Big Guns. Tonight I hear small arms. Small arms training generally lead to one thing, ground troops. I don’t know where they’ll be heading but if I’m correct in my assumption, it’ll likely be Iran. I say this due to the current battle Israel is engaged in with Gaza. Already there has been mention of Iran supplying weapons to Gaza / Hamas. We shall see. I’ll keep watching and listening and let you know what I come across in the coming day’s / week’s.


 

One Tin Soldier LYRICS

Listen, children, to a story
That was written long ago,
‘Bout a kingdom on a mountain
And the valley-folk below.

On the mountain was a treasure
Buried deep beneath the stone,
And the valley-people swore
They’d have it for their very own.

Go ahead and hate your neighbor,
Go ahead and cheat a friend.
Do it in the name of Heaven,
You can justify it in the end.
There won’t be any trumpets blowing
Come the judgement day,
On the bloody morning after….
One tin soldier rides away.

So the people of the valley
Sent a message up the hill,
Asking for the buried treasure,
Tons of gold for which they’d kill.

Came an answer from the kingdom,
“With our brothers we will share
All the secrets of our mountain,
All the riches buried there.”

Now the valley cried with anger,
“Mount your horses! Draw your sword!”
And they killed the mountain-people,
So they won their just reward.

Now they stood beside the treasure,
On the mountain, dark and red.
Turned the stone and looked beneath it…
“Peace on Earth” was all it said.

Go ahead and hate your neighbor,
Go ahead and cheat a friend.
Do it in the name of Heaven,
You can justify it in the end.
There won’t be any trumpets blowing
Come the judgement day,
On the bloody morning after….
One tin soldier rides away.

Go ahead and hate your neighbor,
Go ahead and cheat a friend.
Do it in the name of Heaven,
You can justify it in the end.
There won’t be any trumpets blowing
Come the judgement day,
On the bloody morning after….
One tin soldier rides away.

Attacks Continue Amid Cease-Fire Attempts in the #Israeli #Hamas #War

Day five of Israel’s Operation Pillar of Defense has seen additional rocket fire from Gaza targeting Tel-Aviv, which was intercepted by the Iron Dome system, along with continued Israeli airstrikes and the ongoing targeting of Hamas leaders. Egyptian attempts to reach a cease-fire are reportedly still in motion, while Israel Defense Forces remains poised on Gaza’s border for a full-scale ground invasion.

Smoke rises after an Israeli forces strike in Gaza City, Sunday, Nov. 18, 2012. The Israeli military widened its range of targets in the Gaza Strip on Sunday to include the media operations of the Palestinian territory’s Hamas rulers, sending its aircraft to attack two buildings used by both Hamas and foreign media outlets. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

Smoke rises over Gaza after Israeli strikes on Sunday. (Ahmed Zakot / Reuters)

*****

A Pause for Negotiations in the Israeli Hamas Conflict

November 18, 2012 | 1400 GMT | “A Pause for Negotiations in the Israeli-Hamas Conflict is republished with permission of Stratfor.”

By George Friedman

The Israeli-Hamas conflict has entered into a negotiation phase. Both sides want talks. Hamas wants them because any outcome that prevents an Israeli ground assault gives it the opportunity to retain some of its arsenal of Fajr-5 rockets; the Israelis want them because the cost of an invasion could be high, and they recall the political fallout of Operation Cast Lead in 2008, which alienated many European and other governments.

No matter how much either side might want to avoid ground warfare, negotiations are unlikely to forestall an Israeli assault because Hamas’ and Israel’s goals leave little middle ground.

One of Hamas’ main goals in this current round of fighting is to retain enough Fajr-5 rockets to allow it to threaten the Israeli heartland, the Tel Aviv-Jerusalem corridor. If they succeed, Hamas will have gained a significant lever in its relations with the Israelis. The Israeli goal is to deny Hamas these rockets. The problem for the Israelis is that this requires a ground assault in order to have any chance of success. The Israelis may think they know where the rockets are, but they cannot be certain. Airstrikes can target known facilities, at least those where rockets are not stored in hardened underground bunkers. But only by going in on the ground with substantial force will the Israelis have the opportunity to search for and destroy the rockets.

Finding middle ground will be difficult. The retention of the Fajr-5 both dramatically improves Hamas’ strategic position and gives Hamas the chance to further weaken the Palestinian National Authority. Hamas cannot agree to any deal that takes the rockets away — or that does not at least leave open the possibility that it could have them. Meanwhile, Israel simply cannot live with the Fajr-5 in the hands of Hamas.

Lack of International Involvement

It is interesting to note the remarkable indifference of most countries that normally rush to mediate such disputes, the United States chief among them. Washington has essentially endorsed the Israeli position so strongly that it has no option to mediate. The Turks, who had been involved with the Gaza issue during the flotilla incident of May 2010, have taken no steps beyond rhetoric in spite of relations with both Hamas and Israel. The Saudis have also avoided getting involved.

The Egyptians have been the most active in trying to secure a cease fire: Beyond sending their prime minister into Gaza on Nov. 16, as well as their intelligence chief and a group of security officials, Cairo then hosted a delegation of senior Hamas and Islamic Jihad members to further this goal. But while the Egyptians have a great interest in preventing an Israeli ground invasion of Gaza and are crucial to the Israeli imperative to prevent weapons smuggling via Gaza, there is little more they can do at present to mediate between the two sides.

If no one seems to want to serve as mediator, it is because there is such little room for negotiation. It is not ideology but strategy that locks each side into place. Hamas has come this far and does not want to give up what it has maneuvered for. Israel cannot allow Hamas a weapon that threatens the Israeli heartland. This situation is too serious for the parties to reach an agreement that ends the hostilities for now but in reality simply pushes back the issues to be addressed later. No one is eager to mediate a failure. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon has said he will go to Gaza in the coming week, but he will not be in a position to find middle ground.

Israel will not budge on this. Hamas could be compelled to relent under threat from its core financial supporters in the Arabian Peninsula, but these states, such as Qatar, are all far more concerned with the threat posed by Iran. The fact that these rockets likely originated with Iran ought to give them incentive to lean on Hamas.

Dubious Prospects for Negotiations

It is important to bear in mind that the war is already under way. Israeli airstrikes are intense and continuous. Hamas is firing rockets at Israel. What has not yet happened is a direct ground attack on Gaza by the Israelis, although they have been mobilizing forces and should now be in a position to attack if they so choose. But the Israelis would much rather not attack. They fear the consequences — measured both in human casualties and in political fallout — that would certainly follow.

Thus, both sides want a negotiated end on terms that would leave the other side in an impossible position. While Hamas might be able to live with the status quo, Israel cannot. A negotiated end is therefore unlikely. Still, both sides are signaling their willingness to talk, and however forlorn the possibilities, there is a chance that something could be arranged.

We remain of the opinion that this current pause will be followed by a ground assault. Only by expanding the discussion beyond the Fajr-5 to a broader settlement of Hamas-Israeli issues could these negotiations succeed, but that would require Hamas recognizing Israel’s right to exist and Israel accepting the equivalent of a Palestinian state run by Hamas in Gaza — one that might spread its power to the West Bank. The more expansive the terms of these negotiations get, the more dubious their prospects for success — and these negotiations start off fairly dubious as it is.

*****

Note from RancidNews – After looking around a bit I have to say Mr. Friedman’s leans toward the Israeli side of this conflict. After viewing his Bio on wikipedia, I found out why. He was born in Hungary to Holocaust survivors.